Free yourself from the norm. Express your true self.

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Free yourself from the norm. Express your true self.

During long periods of my childhood, I didn’t have many friends. At that point, I didn’t understand that it was because I wouldn’t conform to what others were doing, acting or saying.

While I didn’t have insight into who I truly was at such a young age, I still followed an inner compass that guided my actions. In addition, I received divine visits, where I believe God drenched me in unconditional love. And, to demonstrate my thankfulness for that amazing blessing, I behaved the best I could. I wanted the Great I Am to be proud of me.

Kathleen in 1975 in Carson City, Nevada.

Kathleen in 1975 in Carson City, Nevada.

As I matured into a gawky teen with braces, I became cynical and logical enough that my heavenly meet-ups ceased. But I still acted in a way (at least most times—after all I was a teenager) that honored me, even if others didn’t think I was cool. I was labeled Goody Two-Shoes, prude, Goat Lady (I walked my goat on a leash through the neighborhood) and more in high school.

I ignored advice to wear hot pants to try-out for the song-leading squad (similar to cheerleading, but more dance-oriented) in high school. Yes, I looked odd wearing long, billowy old lady shorts. And, of course, I didn’t receive enough student votes to win. But I wanted the victory to come from my ability, not by how much skin I exposed. A year later, I became the leader of the high school’s dance drill team partially based on my high talent scores during that tryout that was judged by adults.

Today, I still adhere to what my heart tells me and I defiantly ignore what society says I should wear, participate in or how I should behave. I wear nylons (gasp!) because I feel more polished in them. Fashionistas will never dictate my style. I don’t repost trendy Facebook entries. And, I really dislike reality TV.

I’m not saying you shouldn’t follow the masses if that’s what your heart pushes you to do. Just don’t lose yourself by trying to fit in or fulfilling others’ expectations of you. By doing that, you’re cheating yourself and not appreciating the wonderful creation you are. Don’t act like politicians who check the polls before declaring what they stand for.

Surround yourself with the unconventional. Those who are a bit quirky. Who aren’t afraid to live their own way. That’s one characteristic I love about paranormal investigators. They know people are going to roll their eyes at them. And they don’t care.

The world is homogenized enough. Loosen society’s shackles and experience the freedom of being yourself.

Let’s make this an interesting world, one where we’re courageous enough to allow our eccentric glory to shine.

It’s easier to live joyfully when you spend each day authentically. If people don’t get it, fine. But you’ll release the tethers tying you down and you’ll soar to new heights.

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10 Comments

  1. Cynthia June 8, 2016 at 11:24 am - Reply

    What a timely and inspirational message! It is scary to release those tethers, but when we do, we feel so much lighter–and free to fly.

    Thank you, Kathleen. Your authentic self shines through this post–and all you share–here and in your book. You truly walk your talk, which helps give your readers the courage to do the same.

    • Kathleen June 8, 2016 at 11:31 am - Reply

      Thank you very much, Cynthia. I appreciate your support!

  2. Becky June 8, 2016 at 4:22 pm - Reply

    Kathy you are truly uniquely you. Growing up I was never like everyone else either. My hair was always in a pixie, friends had long hair. Friends wore Levi jeans, I wore pants from Mongomery Wards. Friends were smoking, after I tried it it just wasn’t me. Much of who I was growing up was due to my parents influence. Little parts of the real me, like not smoking, fishing with boys, gardening was the real me.
    I was in my fortys when I started realizing I wasn’t living as myself. I was trying to be something for my parents, my spouse, my children. In my late 40’s I started pursuing things I had intrest in. I started meeting people with similar intrests. I have been finding without the teathers, and not being who my soul tells me I am. I really like myself most of the time. I enjoy my own company.
    Thank you for sharing this. It helps me realize how far I have come.

    • Kathleen June 8, 2016 at 6:10 pm - Reply

      I’m very proud of you. Even in their 40s, many people do not stop living the way their loved ones feel they should. You are being authentic and true to yourself and that’s awesome!! Thank you for following my blog and commenting, Becky!

  3. Sharon Leong June 8, 2016 at 8:41 pm - Reply

    Kathleen – you are an inspiration to all.

    As I teen, I would have rather be friends with the girl walking her goat on a leash than with the school’s fashionista! I’ve always been drawn to people who were not afraid to let their individuality shine!

    And I might add that in order to be true to oneself, one must “Know thyself,” which is for many a life-long quest, and which is not made easier if it means going against the popular tide.

    Bravo to all who have started on the journey to self-knowledge and take courage! The inner reward is worth it!

    • Kathleen June 8, 2016 at 8:50 pm - Reply

      Thank you, Sharon. And yes, I second your bravo to all those who are seeking their true selves.

      One of the aspects I like so much about you is you are so comfortable in your skin. You follow your heart instead of trends. Always refreshing!

      • Sharon Leong June 9, 2016 at 9:46 am - Reply

        Gets easier as years go by… What had always horrified me, however, was the thought that at the end of one’s life, coming to the realization that one had not really been living one’s life at all but rather a life that society, parents or other love ones, however well meaning, had “chosen” for one. I see this a lot in parents who try to live out their own dreams through their children, rather than encouraging their children to seek their own way in life …

        • Kathleen June 9, 2016 at 1:20 pm - Reply

          Very well said, Sharon, and words we should all live by!

  4. Karen Goode June 9, 2016 at 4:29 pm - Reply

    It’s hard to ever imagine you as gawky since you are such a beautiful woman and soul. I do admire your spirit throughout your life and your willingness to share it! I hope many people read your post and feel a little more ‘fearless’!

    • Kathleen June 9, 2016 at 5:01 pm - Reply

      Thank you very much, Karen. I’ve always loved your joyfulness. You are always a pleasure to spend time with.

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